Spoiler: Mega Buzz

11 08 2010

RELEVANT QUESTIONS–DON’T READ IF YOU DON’T WANT TO KNOW!!!

I’m dying to know how One Tree Hill will resolve the Quinn-Clay cliffhanger! — Samantha
ADAM: They both initially survive the shooting, but Clay is in pretty bad shape. We’re hearing that he is still in the hospital as of Episode 3, and it could get even more grim: In that same episode, viewers will spend lots of time with Clay’s ghost.

Who are the new boyfriends this season on Gossip Girl? — Lisa
MICKEY: We already told you that Serena will play le field a bit in Paris. But besides armfuls of couture and croissant-related love handles, she may also tote a cute boy back to New York. But don’t get too attached. He’s an older man with responsibilities — and he may not have the patience for S. & Co.’s collegiate antics.

Credit: TVGuide.com

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Spoiler: Watch With Kristin

13 07 2010

RELEVANT QUESTIONS–DON’T READ IF YOU DON’T WANT TO KNOW!!!

Shield your eyes from the devastation at left!

Yes, Gossip Girl has done it again, tearing apart our beloved Chair…all right, that kinda sounded like we were talking about an actual chair, but obviously we’re referring to the CW’s tortured twosome, Chuck and Blair.

And now the inclusion of Bass’ new babe, Clemence Poésy, to whom he is indulging in some serious lip-lockage in gay Paree, has us concerned: Is this a sign of things to come when G.G. returns this fall? Is Bluck a goner?!

We have scoop on all of Gossip Girl‘s Parisian adventures…

Joanie in Utah: So what’s the deal? Chuck and his new girl have been kissing all over Paris, but where are Blair and Serena, and why aren’t she and Chuck still apart?
Ahhh, Gossip Girl and the games they play. First, let us remind you that we should all be rejoicing! Chuck Bass is alive and well after that near-fatal finale. He is seriously rockin’ that cane too, might we add. Now here’s what we can tell you: The bulk of what’s getting out on the interwebs from Gossip Girl‘s shoot in Paris is mainly Chuck and his new gal-pal, and Blair and Serena pushing each other into fountains. But we have it on good authority that B  and C will in fact reunite in the City of Light; there are some discussions to be had. Don’t expect the two to head back to NYC all lovey-dovey, but maybe, just maybe Blair will begin to forgive Chuck for his Jenny-wandering ways.

Megan in South Carolina: Any Gossip Girl fun to pass along?
Looksie at what we found! Daddy-to-be Dan (Penn Badgley) and his apparently back from Haiti girlfriend Vanessa (Jessica Szhor) aren’t taking this potential parenthood thing lightly. After learning he’s going to have a little bundle of joy with that big bundle of joy Georgina (Michelle Trachtenberg) in the finale, D and V were spotted pushing around a stroller (containing a fake baby—practice makes perfect, right?!) in New York this week. But it’s nice to see these two looking happy, no?

Brynn in Anaheim, Calif.: What’s the situation when 90210 returns?
Adrianna and Navid are still happy as clams?well, kinda. After the budding superstar took off on her summer tour, Navid is having a tough time dealing with a long-distance relationship. Expect things to escalate a bit when school’s back in session and Ade’s not there.

Credit: E! Online





Spoiler: Watch With Kristin

26 04 2010

RELEVANT QUESTIONS–DON’T READ IF YOU DON’T WANT TO KNOW!!!

Forget about Chuck and Blair! The real craziness that’s going down toward the end of this season of Gossip Girl is all about who’s saying goodbye.

On the heels of the news that Taylor Momsen‘s Jenny Humphrey will be leaving the Upper East Side this season, I’m told now that yet another female regular will be heading off into the sunset. (And leaving one heartbroken boy behind.)

So who is it?

Marcio in Ipswich, Mass.: Could we get some news on One Tree Hill or Melrose Place? Will they both stick around?
Nope. I’m told Melrose Place is pretty much a goner. It would take a miracle for it to survive at this point. However, the jury’s still out on One Tree Hill. The ratings in the next few weeks do matter, and it returns with a new episode tonight. (Hint, hint.)

Bob in Oakland, Calif.: Are we gonna see my girl Kristen Bell again on Party Down?
Yes! Adam Scott spilled the scoop: “When the season starts, Uda (Kristen Bell) is my steady girlfriend. But then Casey (Lizzy Caplan) comes back into the fold and kind of screws everything up.” Thus freeing Kristen to reteam with creator and executive producer Rob Thomas for a Veronica Mars movie, right? We kid. But don’t give up hope yet: “I’d love to do one,” said Rob at the Party Down Paley Center for Media celebration for the show’s second season premiere. “Kristen would love to do one…We [just] need someone to pay for it!” Empty your piggy-banks, kids!

Marlo in London: What’s the scoop on Vanessa and Dan on Gossip Girl?
It’s not looking good long-term, sorry! I’m hearing that Vanessa will be leaving not only New York but the country before the end of the season–running off to a superfancy and superfar job with CNN. So yes, Jessica is the second female, along with Taylor Momsen’s Little J, to head off into the sunset. The good news? I’m told by sources that both ladies will still be series regulars next season. As for you wondering what Little J will do that leads to her departure, I’m told “it’s a culmination of lots of things Jenny does to multiple people.” That doesn’t sound good at all!

Matthew in Philadelphia: What’s the word on Gossip Girl?
Don’t expect Serena to continue to sit idly by while Jenny tries to hone in on Nate. The onetime pals and now stepsisters are headed for some seriously rough times ahead.

Jenelle from Conn.: Yay! One Tree Hill is back tonight! The death of Haley’s mom made for such a great episode! What happens after?
Well, when we talked to James Lafferty, he had this to say: “Haley has a long road ahead of her in dealing with her mother’s death, as anybody would. A big part of the Scott family life will be dealing with the grief. It’s definitely a growing experience for the family.” Another tease? Here’s the deal with Nathan for the rest of the season: “He’s finally got some time to spend with his family, and his family at this point in their lives really needs him,” James tells us. “He really gets the opportunity to be a father and a husband.” Model husband and father? Adorable.

Evelyn in Tacoma, Wash.: 90210 is really getting good, but how are things going to go down between Debbie and Harry if Rob Estes is leaving?
Believe it or not, Annie’s going to be the one to point out the marriage woes between her parents, causing them to really sit down and talk things over. But when Debbie finds out that Harry has pretty much enabled Dixon’s little gambling problems, something (one would find in a diaper) is going to hit the fan.

Credit: E! Online

****

Notes:

I can’t see why the ratings at this point would have much of an impact on whether One Tree Hill is renewed. To date, One Tree Hill has outperformed both Gossip Girl and 90210, which received early renewals. Even if One Tree Hill dropped during these next four episodes, Gossip Girl and 90210 have dropped significantly in the last few months. OTH wouldn’t be the only show underperforming. Clearly ratings aren’t the biggest factor to The CW. That said I realize there’s more value in GG/90210 at low ratings than there is with OTH at low ratings. If I had to guess–and I’ll do it with a disclaimer that I’m far less experienced than Kristin–I’d say that while decent ratings are preferred, OTH’s renewal will really be based on how The CW’s pilots turn out and whether the network would rather risk starting a new series or risk sticking with an aging one.

Kristen Bell voices Gossip Girl on, um, Gossip Girl.





Exclusive: Cari Moskow on Being a True Teen Drama Whore

11 04 2010

(Full Disclosure: I conducted this interview in December. For various reasons, it wasn’t published until now. That is not a reflection on Cari at all but rather my own shortcomings. I sincerely apologize to her for the delay.)

I called myself a TeenDramaWhore long before I started this Web site. As I explain on the About The Whore page, a TeenDramaWhore is someone who is obsessed with teen dramas. But what is a true, real-life teen drama whore? That’s easy. Someone who plays a whore on a teen drama!

Cari Moskow has no problem admitting she’s just that, playing a prostitute on One Tree Hill in three different seasons. (Her character, Patty, was first introduced to viewers in Episode 4.04, Can’t Stop This Thing We’ve Started, where Ian “Psycho Derek” Banks–a.k.a. Matt Barr–gets a little, um, psycho with her. ) Moskow gave me the low-down on what she thinks about being Tree Hill’s most recognizable hooker.

TeenDramaWhore: How did you get involved with One Tree Hill in the first place?

Cari Moskow: When I decided to start professionally acting, I was going on lots of auditions in the Southeast and I had an agent that said [the movie] Hounddog needed a stand-in. And I said, “Sure, that would be an awesome opportunity. It sure beats all the random jobs that I’m doing.” So I went on to Hounddog and I stood in for Robin Wright Penn. I became friends with a camera operator, who was actually the DP for One Tree Hill. He just loved me and was like, “You know, you would be great to stand-in on the show. If you ever want to do it sometime, let us know.” So I first did stand-in a little bit.

TDW: For those that don’t know, what does a stand-in do?

Moskow: Every director of photography is different but they want a stand-in who ideally has similar characteristics of the [project’s lead] actress. There’s always a first rehearsal with the actress in the scene. You watch what they’re doing in the rehearsal and then they go into hair and makeup. They’re filming all day and it’s time-consuming. They have to change wardrobe usually, touch-up hair and makeup. So they go into hair and makeup and the stand-in will do the scene, like the actors did. The crew is lighting you. Sometimes they’ll have you do the lines. Whatever they need you to do for the camera shots to get set up for the scene. You learn a lot. It’s a lot of fun. You get to be around the actors. But you also get to practice being comfortable on set, so it was very beneficial for me.

I did this a little bit on One Tree Hill and I had already been acting when I was doing stand-in work. I told the producers and gave them a copy of my acting reel. I was like, “If anything comes up, I’d love to read for the part.” Then one day they said to me, “We want you to read for something. We have something that you might want to go for.” And my agent did not submit me because the role of the prostitute was a brunette and I’m a blonde. But the producers asked me to go in and read. I went and read like everyone else. They had a director in the room and I didn’t know the director, since they have a different director in every episode. I read the sides for the prostitute and I noticed in the room that I had dressed completely differently from everyone else, which I thought was awesome because you have to pick something different to stand out from everyone else. The break-down said something about a rocker tee and leather jacket. I had this jacket that had like fur on it and I had this 80s t-shirt pulled down off my shoulder and a red bra hanging out and I had red lipstick on. I really became the character. I nailed the audition and my agent–because it had to go through her then–ended up calling me and telling me I got the role. That’s pretty much how it happened. It was right place, right time, right look–everything just lined up.

TDW: Did you have any qualms about the role? I mean, it was a) a prostitute and b) one that gets the crap beat out of her.

Moskow: No, I loved it. I really did. As an actress, it’s nice to play something completely different from who you are. That’s what’s fun about it. What I love about acting is that I have my life and what I like to do but I am also able to live in the shoes of someone else. You really experience what [something’s] like. The farther from home, the better. It’s just fun.

TDW: When we saw you again in season 5, [Episode 5.11, You’re Gonna Need Someone On Your Side], it’s Patty again and she’s still a prostitute but now she gets tangled up with Dan [Paul Johansson]. Did the show ask you to come back?

Moskow: Yes. They’ll call you up and ask you to come back and send you the script. That was a lot of fun. It was kind of like Patty cleaned up a little bit but was also back to her old ways.

TDW: Then we saw you again in this season [Episode 7.05, Your Cheatin’ Heart], just a few months ago. We saw you in jail but it was never said whether it was the same character or not.

Moskow: It was the same character. I think they did it for the comedy of it. To show [Patty] is a Tree Hill community member and she’s still around. I think they just thought it was funny because they had prostitutes in the jail cell with Haley [Bethany Joy Galeotti] and were like, “why not just have Patty back?” I’m not a major part of the scene or anything but they thought it would be fun to refresh the memory and show that I’m still around for the fans that do remember. Like, “Well, yep, she’s still getting in trouble.”

TDW: People did recognize your face and did wonder if it was a wink-wink at the audience. Have you done any more standing-in there?

Moskow: No, I’ve actually been living in New York.

TDW: What are you doing there?

Moskow: I went there for training. I got with a studio and I have a manager and an agent there. I’ve worked on some various projects. I’m actually in North Carolina at the moment with family for the holidays. I am moving to L.A. in January. I love New York and I actually miss it so much already but for film and TV, what I’m really concentrating on, and the connections that I have, I feel like L.A. will be a smarter move for me. Every actor struggles with “New York or L.A.? New York or L.A.?” But I’m also a surfer and I love the beach. I’m really into healthy food. It seems like all-around I’ll have a really nice time in L.A.

TDW: Are you originally from the Wilmington area?

Moskow: Yes.

TDW: So you kind of grew up with Dawson’s Creek filming there and One Tree Hill.

Moskow: Yep.

TDW: What do you love about Wilmington?

Moskow: I love the beach. I love that the downtown is right on the water. But I’m a beach girl.

TDW: Any chance we’ll see you again on One Tree Hill?

Moskow: They write the episodes weekly so you probably know as much as I do. I wouldn’t be surprised if something came up. It’s hard to say. But of course I would love to go back. I love filming in a city like Wilmington. Everyone is so friendly and it’s just like family on the set, especially since it’s been seven seasons. So I would definitely love to come back but we will have to see.

TDW: Are you on Twitter?

Moskow: I am not on Twitter, actually. I’m on Facebook and I have a MySpace. But Twitter, I guess I’ll eventually do that. I also have a Web site that I’ve been creating and updating myself. It’s all in steps.

TDW: Baby steps; one thing at a time.

Moskow: Exactly. It takes up a lot of time. There’s only so much you can do.

TDW: Twitter these days is just such a great way to interact with fans. There’s a huge One Tree Hill community there that will hungrily eat up–in a good way–any actor that comes on and is willing to talk with them.

Moskow: I will make it a goal then for 2010 to get on Twitter.

Come back next Sunday for another exclusive interview!

TDW Interview Index





Exclusive: Charles Rosin Talks Beverly Hills 90210, showbizzle and More

14 03 2010

Think the Spellings are the only real-life Beverly Hills 90210 family? Think again. Meet the Rosins: Charles, Karen and their daughter Lindsey.

As you may recall from my previous interview with Charles, he was the executive producer of Beverly Hills 90210 for its first five seasons. Karen wrote nearly 20 episodes between 1991 and 1994 and Lindsey had a memorable cameo in Episode 2.o6, Pass/Not Pass, as a little girl asking Brandon (Jason Priestley) to dance the hukilau at the Beverly Hills Beach Club.

I mentioned in January that my interview with Charles was one of my highlights of TDW Year One. I never dreamed I’d interview him once–let alone twice and this time in person. But that’s exactly what happened in January on a weekday morning in New York City, where Charles, Karen and Lindsey came to promote their new media venture, showbizzle.

Charles and I sat down to talk about showbizzle and, of course, Beverly Hills 90210.

TeenDramaWhore: If you had to give your elevator pitch for showbiz, what would you say?

Charles Rosin: Showbizzle is a digital showcase for emerging talent that combines a webseries called showbizzle with a platform for talent away from the immediate pressures of the marketplace. So it’s two mints in one: it’s a show and it’s a resource for emerging artists. The show is populated by emerging artists and it was really conceived by emerging talents, namely Lindsey Rosin being the first one to be showcased, as the writer and director of the majority of the shows. So that’s the basics of it.

Unlike so many people who do webseries, what they’re hoping is “Oh, everybody loves our webseries and we create so much action and energy, FOX or The CW will find us and want to put us on the air.” We’re not interested in that. If we wanted to do something specifically for broadcast or cable, we would go into the room with those people and say “We think this works for your medium because…” But we like this form, the potential of it, the idea that you can just do what you want to do and not have to go through committees. From a business standpoint, there’s ownership potential that works in the current marketplace.

So the premise of the webseries is that Janey, a young wannabe screenwriter, who is very plugged into the culture of Los Angeles, sits in a coffeehouse in L.A. trying to write her screenplay and looking forward to all her friends who stop by and interrupt her from that. That’s the basic premise of it. What is a lot of fun about it is that for someone like yourself and the audience that you know, that although you meet all these disparate characters doing these short little two-minute snackable, for-the-digital-world kind of stories, you start to realize these characters are related and there is a serialized story. It builds to a serialized place. We’re fans of that. We try to do it with humor and insight and with a lack of snarkiness that is so prevalent in the digital world. We try to do a show that’s engaging.

One of our slogans is, “Just take a little bizzle break.” The one thing about all media, all the shows you cover–and thanks for even thinking about showbizzle in relation to it–is what they really are is diversions. Somehow in the last 20 years, the importance of the television business, the shows that are made, have been thrown so far out of proportion because of the material value of it. But all they are–we have a lot of issues going on the world–is just a little place to get a respite, to get a chuckle or a laugh. One of the things that Lindsey really values is when her friends say, “That happened to me” or “I’ve got a story.” The whole social network aspect came from Lindsey saying, “We should ask our viewers what’s happened to them,” because even though it’s very specific to Hollywood, because that’s where we’re set, at the same time trying to get ahead in life and figuring out what you’re going to do and using every connection you have when you’re kind of an adult but not really an adult, is something [everyone goes through] and we wanted to explore that.

TDW: How did showbizzle start? Who came up with the idea?

Rosin: The origins of showbizzle go back to a day in December in 2005 when Disney announced they were selling Lost on iTunes, which effectively meant the end of the syndication model that financed network television. Producers would make X number of shows and if they had enough, they could sell them to the local stations and other places, and that’s how the revenue would come back to the companies and people would profit from that. Fortunately, I benefited from that twice. Once from [Beverly Hills] 90210 and more recently Dawson’s Creek, which moved into profit because of the syndication of it. But when you sell something prior to syndication, it dilutes the value of the syndication and to do something that as dramatic as to put episodes on iTunes the day they’re running or the day after they run is a fundamental change.

I started thinking about that and how network television was going to be changing. In the spirit of “everything old is new again,” I started thinking about branded entertainment, which goes back to the pre-network era, where with the television of the 50s, companies–Chesterfield Cigarettes, Lucky Strike, Kraft, General Electric–would come in and buy the half-hour or the hour and be totally associated with the show, whether it be variety or comedy or drama. They all had that. That’s how the revenue was derived. I started to think about what company had the resources to do this and is currently not an advertiser on network television. I realized that anyone who was going to put their name above an entertainment project was going to do it and want total ownership and control and then go to a network or then go wherever they want to go.

So I approached Starbucks about a project called Starbucks Presents. We did this in the winter-spring in 2006. We were trying to create a social network for the people who use Starbucks, in store or at home, and program hours of different ways to do things. At the core of it was a daily soap opera about what goes on in a coffee house. Showbizzle is the distillation of that idea. By the way, Starbucks’ response was “Don’t bother us. Come back to us in 5 years. We’re in the music business.” They’re no longer in the music business. They’re still in the coffee business.

TDW: Where does the name come from?

Rosin: Well, we wanted to call it hollybizzle for a while but it was taken. So, showbizzle, not quite show business. And certainly Snoop Dogg is very “fo shizzle” and made my kids laugh. We were sitting around the dinner table–I have two other children besides Lindsey–and we came up with that and said let’s see if that one will work. We like the name quite a bit. It’s friendly and open.

TDW: What is your role on a day-to-day basis? Is this now your full-time gig?

Rosin: I teach at UCLA and I still develop shows. I was very active in the business from the late ‘70s to about 2005. Found my name wasn’t on the lists that I liked anymore and this was a place to do it on my own. The idea to get more sponsorships, provide things for the community–that is where I spend a lot of my time [with showbizzle]. I think like 85, 90 percent of the time I still do other forms of writing and developing other projects as well. I like teaching and I like doing this. If J.J. Abrams called, I’d answer.

TDW: What is Lindsey’s role?

Rosin: I get to refer to her as “the talent.” She’s the writer and director. The other woman who did a lot of writing and directing for the first season is a woman named Arika Mittman and Arika just won a Humanitas Prize for an episode of South of Nowhere that she did. Arika was my assistant on Dawson’s Creek. She’s terrific and very talented and gets along very well with Lindsey. Arika, she’s someone who in a different lifetime would’ve been head of daytime. She plotted the serial a little bit with Lindsey. But Lindsey, I say to her–sometimes to her consternation; it’s a family business and all–anytime she’s involved with the site, it’s better on all levels.

TDW: What has been the response you’re getting from people in the business?

Rosin: I think they admire the effort and realize we’re pioneers. This is not formed. People haven’t done things like this. They always ask, “How are you going to finance this?” and I kind of talk about it but steer away from it a little bit. It’s designed to be branded entertainment and we’re here in New York now to try and find brands. We’re hopeful that we can and we present something that has potential and is different. There’s certain things we did in the first year–we did a lot of monologues; we didn’t emphasize the cinema. We’d like to have a little more production value. Lindsey has a lot of ideas for the second season. We know where to pick up the show and what kind of sponsors we’re looking for. Forms follows function, after all…

TDW: You mentioned finding sponsors. Is that what you did on this trip?

Rosin: One of the most difficult aspects of doing webseries is, whether you’re doing six episodes with friends in your dorm room or if you’re trying to do something to ultimately become a daily habit on the web, is to get the levels of support that you need. When you do branded entertainment, you want to get to brands. Brands have not been oriented to this. So we’re starting to see the change and transition as more and more brands advertise or consider sponsorships and realize that it might be worthwhile to look at certain web series, to brand projects and put their name above the title and all that. It’s a question, though, of “how do you get access to that?” One of the ways is you do something and it goes viral and they come to you and say, “How do you do that?” The other way is to do some work, you put it together, you have more ideas, you go to the brand and say, “With your marketing support, we do A, B, C, D and E” and that’s the method we chose. Creatively, I think showbizzle is somewhere in a middle ground or at least between premium high content and user-generated. We want it have the feel of an independent but be scripted.

There was an event [this week] called Brand In Entertainment, which was an event to meet people who are independent purveyors of content and meet brands and those that are interested in the sector or interested in tipping their toe in. It’s a risk-adverse world, especially after the financial meltdown. It’s all going very slowly. But I had meetings with one or two other people who have access to brands and I wanted to let them know what we’re doing. It was a business-oriented trip.

TDW: You mentioned that you have people who are just starting out in Hollywood playing the characters in the webseries. Is anyone getting “noticed” from it? Any success stories?

Rosin: The thing that’s interesting is remember my original definition: digital showcase, emerging talent away from the immediate career pressures of the marketplace. So really, it’s only about a creative expression. Too much discussion in Hollywood has moved away from any form of creative satisfaction and is only based on business elements. That’s why you always hear about returning an investment and all that. Well, what about creative satisfaction? So the goal of [participating] is not necessarily to further a career but to allow them to perform. We are going to try and accelerate it. We’re going to formally announce soon that we’ll have a rotating group of casting directors as residents and we’ll supply short little monologues and encourage our community to perform them, upload the video and guarantee them that the ones the casting directors like the most, they will comment on them and be on the homepage. You get on the digital showcase. You’re in our community and now you get to be singled out. That might help.

This time last year, a cute little blonde came in and started [working for us], making calls to colleges for outreach. She was really nice. One weekend she told me she had to go to New York. For my class at UCLA, I was putting together a list of what [new] shows [the networks] had ordered so we could [evaluate] them and I saw the girl’s name. It was Brittany Robertson [Lux on Life Unexpected]. She was the girl making our calls. I had Subway sandwiches with her for weeks. I sent her an e-mail and said, “Either you get major kudos or someone has stolen your name!” Now she didn’t perform on showbizzle and I don’t think necessarily that people have seen someone on showbizzle and said, “I need that girl or that guy,” but I think it gives people the confidence to be that girl or that guy.

In the second season we may go after a few names that people know to play little characters. It’ll probably make a difference. Two of the biggest names so far have been Fran Kranz, who was on Dollhouse and was just terrific, and James Eckhouse [Jim], who isn’t in the same demographic. But people can come [to showbizzle] for various reasons. As Lindsey likes to say, they can choose their own adventure. They can focus on getting industry resources or they can focus on the show, they can express themselves, they can take a bizzle break from all the troubles in life.

TDW: What lessons from Beverly Hills 90210 have you been able to apply to showbizzle?

Rosin: The main thing I learned from [executive producer] Aaron Spelling is you make a show for an audience. The audience satisfaction really matters. We continue to adjust to what our audience is looking for, what they say they want. The other thing, which I always like to say, is showbizzle is low-budget production. We were able to do a little content for not very much money but still paid people and all that. 90210 was lower-budget production. We had much less money in the first two or three years than what was there afterward. When we built the college set, that was a big thing for us. We didn’t have big restrictions. The first few years we did. We learned how to do something economically and you learn how someone is paying for all this. Usually that someone is your corporation, whether it’s Disney or Fox or Aaron Spelling. In the case of showbizzle, it’s us. You have to be prudent. Production we were able to handle very well. It’s the digital stuff, the Web site stuff that sometimes spirals out of control.

TDW: I was curious to know if you and Karen were already married when you started working on the 90210 or if the relationship was born out of the show.

Rosin: I met a really cute girl in 1976. We were married a year later in 1977. We’ve been together a long time.

TDW: That is a long time.

Rosin: Yes, we’re very old.

TDW: I know she’s had a career of her own but she wrote close to 20 episodes of Beverly Hills 90210.

Rosin: She wrote the best ones. It was an interesting thing. Mr. Spelling had had a bad taste in his mouth about putting a married team on a show from when he did Dynasty. He never really wanted to let Karen come on the staff and be a permanent part. It allowed her to stay home and raise our kids, which is a great thing but at the same time, she really deserved a lot more recognition as a writer, as a writer-producer, and didn’t really get that from 90210 and I always feel badly about that. But it was circumstances beyond our control. I really love collaborating with her, and I really love collaborating with Lindsey, because you find out with writers, all writers have strengths and all writers have weaknesses. A lot of writers who really excel at dialogue have trouble organizing the story, the scene dynamics. That’s what I do in my sleep. But I’ll struggle over dialogue for hours and hours. So it was a really nice fit with us. One thing I would to say anyone who is starting out and is thinking about collaborating, is that you have to feel whomever you’re collaborating with brings more to the party than you do. You’re not carrying them but you’re benefiting from them. And that’s my relationship with Karen as a writer. Anytime we work together, it gets better.

TDW: I know you did commentary for the earlier seasons of the DVD sets.

Rosin: Karen and I were asked to do it on season 3 and I did an interview for season 4.

TDW: Since season 4, there’s been no extras. We’ve had seasons 5-9 with no extras.

Rosin: Want my opinion? Because there’s nothing to say. The show ended with season 5, in my opinion. Season 5, if you were going to do one, the person you’d need to talk to is Luke [Perry, Dylan] because Luke was so important in those first 12, 13 episodes where he has his money stolen and has his whole depression and anger, leading to the crashing of his car. Luke drove those first 13 and it was a pleasure to do them with him. He had such intensity. If he’s not going to talk about it, then what are you going to say? Tiffani [Amber Thiessen, Valerie] would’ve been the other person to talk to for season 5.

TDW: Some of us have also been upset with the cover art and that many songs have been replaced on the DVDs or scenes were cut because of songs issues.

Rosin: Knowing how much Mr. Spelling cared about the audience, the fact that the music isn’t up to the standards that we had, he’d understand it as a businessman but he’d be rolling over in his grave.

TDW: I heard you were once working on a 90210 spin-off concept with Aaron.

Rosin: When we were thinking about moving forward with the college years, we also proposed they could spin-off a West Beverly High series but they didn’t want to do that at that time. Then in the year 2000, Spelling wanted to do it and I was hired to do something on it but it didn’t turn out to be what they were looking for. It was like 90210, the next generation. I think it had the exact tone of the high school shows but it was just for a different generation of high schoolers. Instead we have this bastardized version that’s on now.

TDW: What was your reaction when you first heard about the one that’s on now?

Rosin: The first reaction was that it just shows how important the brand is and how much branding means. Every generation has the right to do anything. I don’t own it. It was Viacom, Spelling. Darren Star created the show. It was more his world than it was mine. I was there to do something much specific. But now I’m more excited by a show like Life Unexpected than recycling shows from a different era just because of their title. I don’t feel [the new show] has that much in common with the original other than it has a high school premise and it’s in Beverly Hills. But tonally, from what I’ve seen, it doesn’t have that much in common.

TDW: Not sure if you’re aware but they recently killed Jackie Taylor [Ann Gillespie].

Rosin: Why?

TDW: They did this whole cancer storyline.

Rosin: I understand that. When you run out of ideas, you get people sick. No offense to Joey [E. Tata, Nat], but we were struggling and had to do 32 episodes. So Nat’s going to have a heart attack [Episode 4.18, Heartbreaker]. If you see characters getting sick like that at random, it’s usually evidence of a bankruptcy of ideas, in my opinion.

TDW: It came out recently that Rob Estes [Harry, 90210] is leaving the show and people are very surprised. “He’s supposed to be our patriarch. He’s supposed to be our Jim Walsh.”

Rosin: I would imagine that you do things like that when you realize a few things have happened. After the 5th year when I left [the original], so did Gabrielle Carteris [Andrea] but so did Jim Eckhouse and Carol Potter [Cindy]. At a certain point, you get to be a mature show. You realize you have to cut your overhead a little bit. You realize the storylines are going to move into a different direction and things are going to be different. So you do make adjustments. Why did Estes leave? Maybe he was profoundly unhappy with what they’ve done with his character. I wouldn’t know that but that’s usually why actors leave. They weren’t satisfied. The show thought they were paying too much money. He wasn’t being utilized, etc.

TDW: It came out recently that Jennie [Garth, Kelly] is sort of cutting ties with the show as well. The media went crazy with it.

Rosin: I only have admiration for Jennie. I don’t see her that often but I know she’s raising a wonderful family. She has political and social issues she’s very committed to. I really admired her on Dancing With The Stars. She wouldn’t have been able to do that at 21, 22. To have that courage, I admire that a lot. Jennie was very loyal to Mr. Spelling, very loyal to 90210 and I’m sure that led her back to [the new show] in a way. One thing you realize is that people do for their careers what they think is best, both in getting in with things and getting out of things. And I never like to comment on that because at a certain point they thought it was a good idea.

TDW: Are you in touch with anyone else?

Rosin: I am. I’m in touch with the guys. Luke, not as much. Hopefully will get back in touch pretty soon. But Jason Priestley [Brandon] I consider a really good friend. I love Ian Ziering [Steve]. He actually helped on showbizzle, doing an interview. And Jim Eckhouse I actually put in front of the camera. So those are the guys pretty much. And I keep in touch with Gabby through her husband, who is my stock broker.

TDW: I spoke with [writer-producer] Larry Mollin recently and he expressed some interest in doing a panel to talk about the show.

Rosin: If you ever want to do something like that, you let me know.

Come back next Sunday for another exclusive interview!

TDW Interview Index





Spoiler: Watch With Kristin

8 03 2010

RELEVANT QUESTIONS–DON’T READ IF YOU DON’T WANT TO KNOW!!!

Wallace: Any word on whether One Tree Hill or Life Unexpected will get another season?
My sources are telling me it’s most likely that only one will survive, but that it looks like nothing will be announced until the upfronts in New York in May (when the networks announce all their fall schedules). I saw Dawn Ostroff at The Vampire Diaries event Saturday night and wanted to ask, but she slipped into the night all Damon-like. Boo! Oh, and a reminder on Life Unexpected: It moves to 8 p.m. tonight (Monday) on the CW. Check it out if you haven’t yet!

Deirdre: Any scoop on Gossip Girl?
Georgina has found something even bigger than Bible camp: Bleach! When we ran into her in NYC recently, she said this of her upcoming role on GG: “There’s definitely going to be some stalking. There’s gonna be a few changes to Georgina’s appearance, so you’ll have to tune in and see if you can recognize me.” When we guessed she was going blond, M.T. just said, “I don’t know,” but from the looks of this new photo we just nabbed of her, I fear she may be going Single White Female on Serena’s ass. Run for you life, “S”!

Maureen in Boston: You need to give more scoop on One Tree Hill! What’s happening coming up?
I’m hearing Haley is going to go into severe depression following her mom’s death. Sadness.

Rebecca: How about some 90210 scoop please!
Soitenly! I’m hearing that Dixon and Ivy are going to fake-date to make Liam jealous, but Dixon is going to start having some feelings for Ivy. Oh, the tangled web young love can weave!

Credit: E! Online





Exclusive: 90210’s Michael Steger Talks Navid’s Future, Journalism and More

7 03 2010

I first interviewed Michael Steger in spring 2008, shortly after The CW announced they ordered their 90210 pilot as a full series. He and the rest of the cast didn’t know much about their characters yet but he did know this: he’d sort of be Andrea Zuckerman version 2.0, via his association with the West Beverly Blaze.

I was sold. After all, Andrea had been the Beverly Hills 90210 character I identified with most (at least until she got pregnant and married–in that order–while a freshman in college…can’t say that happened to me!). A season-and-a-half later, I’m more than pleased to see Steger’s character Navid Shirazi still has the journalism connection.

While chatting on the phone earlier this week, Steger shared with me his favorite real-life journalists, filled me in on Navid’s storyline for the next few episodes (is there a possible battle of the red-heads brewin’?) and expressed where he’d like to see 90210 to go in season 3.

TeenDramaWhore: I’ve been reading up and watching the other interviews you’ve done lately. There’s a clip showing Navid by the lockers in school, wanting to plant some drugs on Jasper [Zachary Ray Sherman].

Michael Steger: I end up finding a way to get cocaine and I have a plan to use it to get Jasper kicked out of school. I’m trying to recruit Dixon [Tristan Wilds] and Liam [Matt Lanter] to help.

TDW: What is his motivation? Is it strictly because he wants his own revenge or is it out of concern for Annie [Shenae Grimes]? Or both?

Steger: I think it’s a little bit of both. I know Jasper pushed me down the stairs and no one else believes me. I also caught him selling drugs to Adrianna [Jessica Lowndes] and he’s also hurting Annie. So there’s a lot of reason for Navid to have pure hate for this guy. There’s a lot motivating Navid.

TDW: Is Navid any way connected to the Adrianna-Gia [Rumer Willis] romance?

Steger: I think Navid is questing his manhood. His self-esteem is really hurt. He’s asking himself a lot of questions, like “Does she not like men because she was with me? What’s going on?” He’s kind of perturbed a little bit that they’re together. He’s not used to it.

TDW: I’ve also heard that Navid gets a girl of his own.

Steger: Yes. Coincidentally, we’re both dating red-heads. I end up dating my star reporter, Lila [Amber Wallace (Glenda, One Tree Hill)], who’s almost as ambitious as I am. She works for the Blaze. I went through so much with Adrianna and Jasper and it’s made me completely devoted to journalism.

TDW: Speaking of journalism, I really like the journalistic side of Navid, for obvious reasons. I was wondering if you have a favorite journalist or someone in the media world you really admire.

Steger: Yeah, absolutely. Love Charlie Rose. Every time I catch him late at night, I really enjoy watching him. The questions he asks–I think he’s so smart. Diane Sawyer, love her. I really enjoy Bill Maher. I don’t know that he’s necessarily a hard-hitting journalist. More like a personality.

TDW: Going back to the show, I heard that the season finale is called Confessions. So I’m wondering how Navid figures into that. What might Navid be confessing?

Steger: Ohhh, you’ve got the good questions! He does have a confession. I can’t say what. It’s such a good episode. I think the fans are really, really going to like this one. A lot goes down and you see everybody’s true colors come out. He’s going to take everybody by surprise.

TDW: Is there anything in particular you’d like to do in season 3? Any storylines you want to tackle?

Steger: I’d like for the Blaze to showcase more hard-hitting issues, bringing hot topics to the forefront and educating our audience. I feel like there’s so much out there kids should be aware of. For instance, what’s going on in Haiti and different things around the world. I think those topics should be intertwined in storylines to get people aware. We’re part of pop culture and as much influence as we can impress upon kids, the better. So I would say promote more positive messages, because I know we’re busy always pushing the envelope and all the drama but it’s always good to throw some good examples in there.

TDW: I think that’s a really good idea. Something else I’ve heard from readers is that they want to know more about Navid’s family. We’ve seen your parents briefly here and there but will we see them again, maybe in a larger capacity?

Steger: Yeah, I think so. The writers, we’ve been talking about diving more into Navid’s relationship with his dad and the porn industry and how dysfunctional it is and how Navid feels about it. It’s almost like Navid is trying to escape that and wants to find success in something he finds classy and artistic. I think there’s a lot of room for stories with his family. He has to deal with this materialistic life as best as he can but it’s overwhelming. He drives a Lamborghini; he lives in a mansion. It’s a lot to deal with. It’s a lot of pressure for him.

TDW: You’ve already finished filming for the season, so what’s next for you?

Steger: I went to New York right away to see a bunch of theater. Now I’m getting back to my actor roots, looking for jobs and projects to get involved with. I’m having a great time. I’m really excited for this break.

Come back next Sunday for another exclusive interview!

TDW Interview Index








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